Plastic bottles and fishing nets. The future of automotive interiors.

This week, the Cupra brand launched its first 100% electric vehicle, the Born. I’m rather excited about the prospect of this rear wheel drive hot hatch from the future.

This week, the Cupra brand launched its first 100% electric vehicle, the Born. I’m rather excited about the prospect of this rear wheel drive hot hatch from the future; on paper it looks pretty quick and has more range than you’d ever need in normal use from the optional 77kWh battery.

There was however, one particular item on the spec list that caught my attention.

The SEAQUAL® YARN seats are made from a blend of recycled marine waste, collected from the sea floor, rivers and beaches all over the world. Plastic waste such as plastic bottles, bags and fishing nets are collected, sorted and cleaned before being processed into recycled marine plastic, used to create the polymer yarn.

Whist sustainable materials aren’t anything new in automotive interiors, particularly seating, there is certainly a greater expectation that vehicles should be produced more sustainably. As designers, we’re always considering new materials and there continues to be a growing choice of materials produced more sustainably.

Where will things go from here? Circular systems will certainly become more prevalent, as will the use of recycled, reusable or sustainable materials. Not only will we see an increasing use of new materials, but also of traditional materials such as wool (sustainable, soft and naturally temperature regulating) in automotive interior applications.

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